St. Brigid's Catholic Church
cnr Livingstone and Marrickville Roads, Marrickville

Henry Bryceson 1865, rebuilt S.T. Noad & Son 1957 (3/36 electro-pneumatic)








From SOJ December 1965, June/July 1981, June/July 1994

St. Brigid's is one of the largest and most beautiful Catholic churches in Sydney. Its large tower, like that of St. Clement's Anglican Church, Marrickville, can be seen for some distance. The organ was built in 1865 by Henry Bryceson of London for an unknown location in England and was later installed in ''Bomerah", residence of the brothers McQuade, Potts Point. It was moved in 1921 to St. Brigid's where it was rebuilt by S.T. Noad & Son in 1957. The instrument was originally operated by tracker action, but this was removed so that the case could be divided on either side of a rose window with a centrally placed detached console. Despite the alterations which have taken place, the instrument has mostly retained its original specification, and the voicing has not been changed. The organ speaks in an excellent acoustic.

Click here to download an MP3 (3.2MB) of Michael Dudman playing the Gigout Scherzo



The organ has the following stoplist:

Great
Double Bass
Open Diapason
Gamba
Salicional
Harmonic Flute
Principal
Twelfth
Fifteenth
Trumpet

Swell
Double Diapason
Open Diapason
Viol de Orchestra
Lieblich Gedact
Keraulphon
Flute
Principal
Mixture
Vox Humana
Oboe
Cornopean

Choir
Rohr Flute
Echo Dulciana
Gamba
Voix Celeste
Gamba
Gedackt Flute
Gemshorn
Cor Anglais
Clarinet

Pedal
Open Metal
Open Wood
Bourdon
Bass Flute
Violone
Gemshorn
Trombone

16
8
8
8
4
4
2-2/3
2
8


16
8
8
8
8
4
4
II
8
8
8


8
8
8
8
4
4
2
8
8


16
16
16
8
8
4
16









A
































A


Electro-pneumatic action
15 couplers





Photos: Trevor Bunning (Dec 2008)




Fred Hawkins writes (March 2009):

I came across this picture and wondered whether it would be of use to the Society. It shows how the Bryceson organ in St Brigid's Church in Marrickville looked during the period of my tenure there which was from about 1943 until the organ was taken out of service for a rebuild in about 1955. The shot is taken from the same perspective as those on your website of the organ after the rebuild and so may fill out the history of this very nice organ. Before the rebuild, it had a hybrid action, mostly tracker but with tubular pneumatic for the Pedal organ and for some of the Swell. Although it was a bit of a beast to play as the action loaded up very heavily under couplers, the combination pedals (of which there were 8) were heavy to operate and very noisy, and the Swell and Choir shutter control was primitive with notched sticks to hold the boxes open, it was nevertheless a very responsive and satisfying instrument and was maintained in fully operational condition.

Fred Hawkins